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20 New Yorker Design Stories To Read Now

fastcodesign:

Curl up with your iPad while the archives are free

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So far, the best thing about the New Yorker’s digital revamp is not the new site design, but rather the opening of the magazine’s storied archives. For the next three months, articles dating back to 2007 (plus select additional features) are free to all visitors, offering non-subscribers a chance to revisit some of the best design writing of the past decade.

Here are Co.Design’s picks for your weekend reading. 

(via fastcompany)

Source: fastcodesign
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fastcompany:

Turns out what doesn’t kill you really does make you stronger.

At the age of 23, Alan Lock, a junior officer in the British Royal Navy, began to experience impaired vision. An eye test revealed he had macular degeneration and would be legally blind within a month.

The Royal Navy had no choice but to discharge Lock from his post—one that he had dreamed of since he was a child. Forced to give up on his career, Lock refused to give up on life and set his mind on a new goal and became the first legally blind person to row a boat across the Atlantic Ocean. He later became the first blind person to trek across Antarctica and the first blind person to run the Marathon de Sables in the Sahara. In addition to setting world records, he’s raised thousands of dollars for worthy charities and become a worldwide inspiration.

We all love an amazing comeback story; especially those about someone who recovered from a horrible event that caused them to re-think their entire worldview and purpose and emerged astonishingly successful. Psychologists David B. Feldman and Lee Daniel Kravets call these individuals “supersurvivors.” In their bookSupersurvivors: The Surprising Link Between Suffering and Success they argue there are common characteristics of those who are able to turn a traumatic event into a personal success story.

Although the authors are careful to point out they aren’t advocating trauma, they say these individuals are extreme examples of tapping into the resilient nature that lies within all of us. Whether overcoming a traumatic event such as a sudden loss of eyesight or a minor setback such as losing a key client at work, Feldman and Kravets say there are four key traits that make supersurvivors so resilient that we can all learn from:

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Source: Fast Company
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fastcompany:

Inbox zero is a myth, an urban legend relayed by merry pranksters who want you to go crazy trying to respond to every email you ever receive. At least that’s how I feel.

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Source: Fast Company
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fastcompany:

The fastest-growing demographic in the workforce knows a few things about motivating and leading others.

With their widespread entrance into the workplace, millennials are bringing new requirements of employee engagement that include creativity, entrepreneurialism, and accelerated career growth. Research by Deloitte is projecting that millennials will make up 75% of the global workforce by 2025. They are supportive of—and engaged with—companies that care about more than a high-profit margin.

Leaders are noticing the change. According to Deloitte, 78% of business leaders rate retention and engagement as urgent or important.

What secrets of employee engagement can you pick up from millennials? It’s not about pay or work-life balance. Here are some ways to increase engagement in your organization:

Read More>

Source: Fast Company
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rock-the-trails:

What it feels like to run for the first time after longer injury break ;-)

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chellrose:

where do I get this?

I want to go to there

(via hungryrunner)

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tastefullyoffensive:

The big question of the Commonwealth Games. [x]

tastefullyoffensive:

The big question of the Commonwealth Games. [x]

Source: tastefullyoffensive
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thatkindofwoman:

If I Were a Carpenter - Johnny Cash & June Carter Cash

Source: apoetreflects