Photo

fastcompany:

The answer to getting more done and leading a balanced life isn’t in beating yourself up about ambitions.

We’ve entered a new paradigm. One in which women, particularly in the West, have greater opportunity than ever before and yet are feeling stressed out, anxious, and exhausted trying to cope with the pressure to succeed in all areas of life. Despite external success, many women have a feeling of not measuring up or being good enough. Other women are leaning in so strongly that they are burning out. It’s a catch-22: how do we lean in without burning out?

Research shows bright girls are particularly likely to see their abilities as innate and unchangeable, and they grow up to be women who are far too hard on themselves—women who will prematurely conclude that they don’t have what it takes to succeed in a particular arena and give up way too soon.

Our experience is that women blame themselves. Therefore, many women are reading Lean In and thinking “Oh, I guess I wasn’t leaning in hard enough, I need to push myself even more.”

Here are the tenets for how to lean in without burning out:

Read More>

Source: Fast Company
Photo

fastcompany:

Daily reading habits can expand your thinking. Here’s what you should be reading and how to take make the most of the time you have.

Read More>

Source: Fast Company
Photo
Photo
Photo

justyouraveragehaggis:

beckyhop:

zftw:

we need to talk about that house loan

It’s gonna cost you a leg. Specifically, that guy’s prosthetic leg.

I need it.

I also need that guy’s eye.

(via pizzaboozetelly)

Source: awwww-cute
Photo
Photo

fastcompany:

Starbucks gets great PR when a chain of customers pays for each others coffee. But thats not whats really going on.

When you combine coffee with a poor understanding of economics, two things can happen: You feel smug and self-congratulatory, or you demonize the wrong person. Both happened at the same Starbucks this week, when a chain of 378 people “paying it forward” was supposedly broken by “some cheap-ass” in a white Jeep.

Cheap Bastard Ends 10 Hours of Starbucks Customers ‘Paying it Forward’” was Gawker’s headline summary of the event. The news, which began in a local paper, even made the Today show.

Everyone seems to misunderstand what’s actually happening during these “pay-it-forward” chains, which occasionally develop at this and other coffee joints. So let’s break it down, at the end of which you’ll understand this: The woman in the white Jeep is innocent. And nobody involved in these chains should be overly pleased with themselves.

Read More>

Source: Fast Company
Photo Set

adulthoodisokay:

lawebloca:

Little Girl Plays on Gentle Giant Tibetan Mastiff ** video **

welp there goes my heart. god, i love tibetan mastiffs.

Source: lawebloca
Photo Set

capricious:

rose-j:

This is my kinda pool party

couldn’t reblog this fast enough.

(via megwhat)

Source: cubebreaker
Photo

fastcompany:

I have a lot of ideas in my head. And for the most part, that’s where they used to stay.

In my head. Where other people couldn’t see them, interact with them or build upon them. Where they were safe and untested and uncriticized. All mine.

Sure, I’ve created some. Some might say I’ve created plenty. But that’s only because they can’t see what I’m not creating. For example, this very post sat dormant for at least a month while I pondered, waited and nitpicked at it.

Because the riskiest, most dangerous and potentially most interesting ideas are the easiest to hold back. I would pin them down like butterflies on a mat, like art at a museum. They were in spreadsheets, in notebooks, on scrap paper around my desk.

And while it might feel creative to think of these ideas, they were dying a lonely death when I wasn’t doing anything with them. They didn’t get their chance to add anything to the world. To affect someone. To spark something.

I lost out, too, with this arrangement. I didn’t push myself to think deeper and harder. I lost out on the feedback or insight or even criticism of others. I missed the chance to discover uncharted territory within myself. I stopped before I could start.

It wasn’t the best life I could give my ideas—or myself.

So I decided to change. To find a way forward, I cataloged all the things that had ever stopped me from creating so I could shoot them down, one-by-one. It turned out to be a helpful exercise, so I thought I’d share.

Do any of these reasons for not creating something sound familiar to you?

Read More>

Source: Fast Company